Friday, March 29, 2013

Heads up: Guillotine is Funny and Fun


The Review Crew's Take on
Guillotine

# Players . . . 2-5 
Game time . . . . . . . . 30 minutes
Set up . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 minute
Luck . . . . . . . 5 . . . . Strategy
*Interplay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Visual Appeal . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.5
Component Quality . .. . . . . 7
*Replayability . . . . . . . . . . . 9


*See "How we Rate" for a definition.

Spring Break ahead, which means a road trip and possible down time for game playing. And that's when easy-to-bring-along card games come in handy. Here's one that will no doubt make the pack list: Guillotine.

If you haven't played this game you've probably seen it in game stores and wondered how the game designers could have ever created a game out of something as gruesome as chopping off people's heads. Well, here's how--they don't take it seriously.  

Guillotine is self-described as irreverent and humorous. It achieves both qualities through clever illustrations and a tongue-in-cheek premise that's described like this: you, as game players, are "rival guillotine operators, vying for the best collection of heads."

So, what constitutes a valuable head? Why, a noble one, of course, and the more important the noble, the more the head is worth. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette are, naturally, the top score getters.

This game is easy to learn and play and has a nice balance of luck and strategy. A row of nobles, as cards, are lined up, waiting for their turn at the chopping block. On your move, you can either take the noble next in line or play an action card that switches things up. The action cards make for all sorts of fun twists to the game and create lots of interplay. After three rounds, scores are tallied and the person with the most notable nobles wins.

Just don't let victory go to your head.           

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